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Category Archive for 'Historical Facts'

Defeat of Hugh O’Neill

Dec 26, 1601 Hugh O’Neill was defeated in one of the most important battles of Ireland.  In Kinsale he awaited help from the Spanish which didn’t arrive and he was forced to retreat.  He sailed to Europe several years later in what is known as the “Flight of the Earls” and Ireland was lost to […]

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On Nov 24, 1922, Erskine Childers was executed by Free Staters for possession of a pistol.  Ironically this had been given to him previously by Michael Collins.

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Michael Collin’s squad killed 11 British agents, members of the “Cairo Gang”, in early morning raids in Dublin on Nov 21, 1920. At a GAA football match in Croake Park on Nov 21, 1920, British soldiers opened fire on the spectators and players, killing 12 and wounding hundreds.

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Wolfe Tone’s Death

On Nov 19, 1798 Wolfe Tone died after a self-inflicted wound in Dublin Barracks.

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Robert Adrian was born in Co Antrim in 1775.  As a United Irishman he fought in the Rebellion of 1798.  He was shot in the back and left for dead after which he escaped to America.  He returned to his former profession of teaching.  He was a Professor of Mathematics and held a number of […]

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In the southern portion of the sky there is an area  called “the Sea of Serenity.”  Nearby there is a small, circular cup shaped crater.  This is called “the Clarke crater” in memory of a great Irish woman Agnes Clarke born in 1842.  Mostly self-taught, she chronicled the leading edge of astronomical research.  Her assessments […]

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The Tricolor was brought from France in 1843.

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Early Years Irish Potatoes

Fields were sown year after year in the same soil as there was no land to lie fallow.  Therefore, the potatoes couldn’t get the nutrients that would normally be present.

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Famine Village

The Famine Village in Doagh, Donegal tells the story of family and community living on the edge and surviving from the Great Hunger to the present day.

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On Oct 3, 1691 Patrick Sarsfield signed the Treaty of Limerick, surrendering to the British.    His words were: “As low as we are now, change but kings, and we will fight it all over again with you.”  He was criticizing King James’ performance in Ireland.

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